Written By , on December 15, 2006

When you think about glamour, who comes to mind?

Depending on your age, you may think of Grace Kelley or perhaps more recently, Princess Diana. What if you had to pick a contemporary person, someone from today who you consider glamorous? Does anyone readily come to mind? It seems as if some residents from the land of celebrity have tried to channel old Hollywood and bring back glamour.

Perhaps we must first go to the roots of Glamour and see the evolution to understand how it has changed. It’s no secret that there was a time in Hollywood after the 20’s til the late 40’s, known as the golden age of Hollywood, when glamour was everywhere. There were studio bosses and moguls who at the time created stars and personas – not just simple people. These stars, whether male or female, personified glamour and as a result fascinated audiences with their striking looks and interesting characters. Therefore, with such personalities as Cary Grant and Humphrey Bogart, how could a girl look away from the screen? Also with unique faces such as Bette Davis and Norma Shearer there was hope for everyday women that they too could capture the spirit.

After the 50’s, Glamour stepped aside to let television and the suburban housewife take center stage. Couples were no longer calling each other darling. Instead they were changing their little darling’s diaper. Next, the 60’s came along with free love and drug experimentation. Onto the 70’s disco era, the 80’s and bad hair, the 90’s with grunge, until today, a new century. Here we are in a new time to express ourselves. So where is glamour today? Is it possible to possess glamour in a contemporary, technologically advanced society? I think so.

Currently, with stars like Christina Aguilera and Scarlett Johansson we are almost instantaneously transported to the graveyard of glamour. Platinum hair combined with red lips equals’ glamour right? Wrong! What is missing from this equation is the essence of glamour. When looking up the word glamour in a thesaurus words like allure, bewitchment, charisma, and magnetism abound. These words are the nucleus of glamour. They convey the certain attitude amongst the glamorous not necessarily snobbery, but a complete confidence of spirit. While Christina Aguilera has definitely got the look down, the essence seems to be missing. This woman has transformed herself from a childhood mouseketeer, to a dirty girl, and now a glamour model. She obviously likes to change her public persona and will, more than likely, move onto another look later in life.

Today, the essence of glamour is not obvious in Hollywood. While we see actors dressed for the red carpet, it has only become a floor for criticism. We look at a star in dress and quickly decide our judgment. Celebrity has been drummed down to the point that you don’t actually have to be talented or smart to become famous. How can this current crop of celebrities possess an air of glamour?

Perhaps there still is a spark. One spark who comes to mind was Princess Diana. While she struggled privately, she always held a proper demeanor. Dressed for every occasion, Diana championed causes for the less fortunate and always worked for the benefit of others. This woman possessed the caliber of glamour. She held the spark that made her different, interesting, and unique.

As I stated before, glamour, while it is a look, is also an essence. While some stars can copy the looks of Marilyn Monroe and Grace Kelley, they can never embody their spirit. So when looking in contemporary time I see people like Angelina Jolie, Bono, and Oprah as possessing glamour. They all enjoy physical beauty while transcending into a level that only few can hope to obtain, through glamour.

And now a word from


Written By , on November 10, 2006

I’ve always secretly yearned for a white trash grandmother. The kind who would wear a purple sweatshirt with a kitten on it and bring over warm cookies on snow days.

What I got was Mimi, the human embodiment of Classic. Her immaculate white hair was always curled, Chanel No. 5 accompanied her like a shadow, and, to top it off, she slept in lace Dior nightgowns.

To my grandmother, I eternally looked homeless.
My ripped jeans and flannel clashed with her cashmere and pearls.

As a kid growing up in the 90’s, I attempted to blend grunge and hip hop style. I wore oversized Starter jackets for sports teams I’d never head of, hummed the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air theme song like it was an anthem, and went for extended periods of time without washing my hair. God, I was trying so hard to be cool.

She wore her height like book-balancing royalty; My shoulders collapsed down the front of my body like a waterfall. Her fingers were manicured, mine were bitten.

We were different, bound by the reality of our eras. And so while we overlapped on the planet for sixteen years, I feel like I missed her in time.

In February 2000, my grandmother died of breast cancer: still looking stunning with every hair in perfect place. Her book closed and a chapter of my life ended.

~~~~

Sophomore year in college, I came out of the closet as loving fashion. Up until that point, I was secretly memorizing Vogue like teenage boys do with Penthouse. I face planted into fashion theory, wrote a thesis on couture, and formally introduced myself to the work of doyenne, Gabrielle ‘Coco’ Channel.

What I found amidst the tales of Chanel’s genius, the epics written on her grace, brilliance, and unparalleled style, was an understanding of a woman I was never able to crack: my grandmother.

Reading the biographies written on Chanel were like stumbling upon the Rosetta Stone of my heritage.

Through them, I began to get a sense of the time and circumstances that formed who my grandmother was, and what she aspired to be: Chanel.

Coco Chanel offered a living example of a woman who possessed intelligence, an unthreatening drive, and an alluring, but never vulgar, sexuality. She did all of that without compromising feminine beauty.

Mimi followed her lead, literally, in her shoes.

Six years after my grandmother’s death, I still bite my nails, and am happiest in a pair of jeans. Though, now I opt for Paper Denim and Cloth.

But, on cold days, I rummage through the back of my closet to the places that smell like cedar and moth balls and wrap myself in Mimi’s vintage cashmere sweater before heading out onto the street. Granted, it looked different on her, but it looks good on me.

I’m grateful that Chanel never goes out of style. It gave me time to grow into her clothes on my own terms, combining one part classic and two parts cool.

And now a word from


Written By , on November 1, 2006

I’ve always secretly yearned for a white trash grandmother. The kind who would wear a purple sweatshirt with a kitten on it and bring over warm cookies on snow days.

What I got was Mimi, the human embodiment of Classic. Her immaculate white hair was always curled, Chanel No. 5 accompanied her like a shadow, and, to top it off, she slept in lace Dior nightgowns.

To my grandmother, I eternally looked homeless.
My ripped jeans and flannel clashed with her cashmere and pearls.

As a kid growing up in the 90’s, I attempted to blend grunge and hip hop style. I wore oversized Starter jackets for sports teams I’d never head of, hummed the Fresh Prince of Bel-Air theme song like it was an anthem, and went for extended periods of time without washing my hair. God, I was trying so hard to be cool.

She wore her height like book-balancing royalty; My shoulders collapsed down the front of my body like a waterfall. Her fingers were manicured, mine were bitten.

We were different, bound by the reality of our eras. And so while we overlapped on the planet for sixteen years, I feel like I missed her in time.

In February 2000, my grandmother died of breast cancer: still looking stunning with every hair in perfect place. Her book closed and a chapter of my life ended.

~~~~

Sophomore year in college, I came out of the closet as loving fashion. Up until that point, I was secretly memorizing Vogue like teenage boys do with Penthouse. I face planted into fashion theory, wrote a thesis on couture, and formally introduced myself to the work of doyenne, Gabrielle ‘Coco’ Channel.

What I found amidst the tales of Chanel’s genius, the epics written on her grace, brilliance, and unparalleled style, was an understanding of a woman I was never able to crack: my grandmother.

Reading the biographies written on Chanel were like stumbling upon the Rosetta Stone of my heritage.

Through them, I began to get a sense of the time and circumstances that formed who my grandmother was, and what she aspired to be: Chanel.

Coco Chanel offered a living example of a woman who possessed intelligence, an unthreatening drive, and an alluring, but never vulgar, sexuality. She did all of that without compromising feminine beauty.

Mimi followed her lead, literally, in her shoes.

Six years after my grandmother’s death, I still bite my nails, and am happiest in a pair of jeans. Though, now I opt for Paper Denim and Cloth.

But, on cold days, I rummage through the back of my closet to the places that smell like cedar and moth balls and wrap myself in Mimi’s vintage cashmere sweater before heading out onto the street. Granted, it looked different on her, but it looks good on me.

I’m grateful that Chanel never goes out of style. It gave me time to grow into her clothes on my own terms, combining one part classic and two parts cool.

And now a word from


Written By , on August 1, 2006

With the announcement of the shuttering of Teen People magazine’s print edition many have begun to wonder if there is a movement exclusively towards new media. Even in the fashion world the print vs online phenomena is taking a new tack. With the rousing success of online publications such as Hint, Zoozoom, Theblowup and countless others, the print world looks mired in the old, slow-as-molasses production schedules, ineffectual presentations and same old rehash features.

A webmaster of a fashion site told me about a year ago that print magazines routinely go to her and her site for content ideas. The harsh unaccepting world of established media outlets for fashion outsiders now seem less harsh and more accepting if in name only. They still dictate from their ivory towers in New York, they still -at times- publish as if new media is some sort of foreign land, but ever so slowly they are starting to realize that a footprint online is better than none at all.

While most fashion sites run by large print publishers exist as a subscription driver to their print versions, a growing number feature original content not found in the aforementioned print editions. Style.com definitely takes the lead in this regard. They feature photoshoots and up to the minute reporting that a reader won’t find on sister publications Vogue and W.

The interesting thing about online fashion magazines that you don’t find with print is the diversity in voice. Online fashion sites are run in New York, Miami, Los Angeles and everywhere in-between. They are run by all sorts and types. They provide range that you may not find in your (insert favorite magazine here). It’s this openness and low barrier to entry that allows online magazines to exist that would not have if the internet didn’t exist. Conversely, because almost anyone can publish a fashion blog and to a lesser extent online magazine, the accuracy, fact checking and authoritative voice from the ivory tower is lost in the online world but reliably exists offline and in print.

So now the question becomes where does the future lie? While not attempting to sound prophetic, I can say with a certain sense of assuredness that print fashion magazines will always exist in one form or another.The oddmakers in Vegas may disagree with me but what do they know? There’s something about receiving that 700 page magazine (most of it glossy ads) with 2 pages of features in the mail or at a newsstand. That stack of magazines in my living room grows everday. And while there are no moving images or music set to a W feature story, it’s great reading on the commute to work or a lazy Sunday. The internet may be the future of fashion media but print will be the foundation on which it is built.

And now a word from


Written By , on July 5, 2006

When I was younger I would at times hear my grandparents speak of their youth and how they longed for those times. Fast forward 20 years or so (give or take) and I am starting to recognize why they had a love for all things nostalgic.

For me the lamenting of older times came after the release of Pam Anderson’s sex tape, then Paris Hilton’s sex tape, then R. Kelly’s sex tape … with a minor. It came from Kate Moss’ coke fest at the studio. It came from Naomi Campbell’s beating up on the help. What about Brangelina, Bennifer and Blakegate? Ok the last one I made up for alliterative purposes. No one came up with a name for the Robert Blake fiasco so I figured why not?

These celebrities (take that term in the loosest possible sense) appeal to the lowest common denominator. They would sell their souls for the quickest possible road to fame and a buck. The photographers that follow them and those that consider themselves serious news journalists are no better. Instead of going for the next Pulitzer covering ethnic cleansing in some third world country, they sit camped out in front of Jennifer Anniston’s house hoping to catch a glimpse of Vince Vaughn by the pool. I guess someone has to do the dirty work.

The celebrities of yesteryear were flawed as well. There are no halos around the likes of Marilyn Monroe, James Dean and Marlon Brando. The difference may be that we have 24 hour access to celebrities of our time. If Colin Farrell is in bed with a married young starlet, we will know the minute the condom comes off. DNA testing will prove that the tryst happened; but who will need DNA when the DVD is on sale at your local porn emporium? His publicist would have already spun the affair into something that could put more rears in seats for the debut of Miami Vice.

The time of the fashion icon with grace, mystery and majesty may be over. Audrey Hepburne may have had several interests but you would never be in her bedroom with night vision video recording the whole affair. Frank Sinatra may have slept with half of Hollywood but he did it his way and we never knew about it except for the rumors. That mystique is gone and when I read about Star Jones’ stomach stapling and face lift, I long for it.

And now a word from


Written By , on June 1, 2006

The only way to feel truly beautiful is to look within before looking in the mirror.

“She is beautiful…” The boy I love just told me that he loves another; his reason is that she is something I am not-beautiful. I’m smart and witty, silly and fun, but I am not particularly beautiful. Melissa was a beauty; long curls flowing past her shoulders, big blue eyes with fluttering lashes. I looked plain; a “bowl-cut” on my head that was somehow always crooked, freckles plastering my face, and orthopedic shoes to cap off the look. It was the 70’s and I was just a child, but I was in love and he did not want me. Can you imagine my pain? 1st grade was a big year for me. I learned some of the toughest lessons of my life, the first being that physical beauty matters and I did not have it.

I was beautiful on the inside. I am a bright light and this was always evident. I knew that my soul was beautiful; my mistake was in thinking this was enough. By 5th grade I had accepted that I would never win any beauty contests and made peace with my place in life. Boys loved me, just not in the way they did the beautiful girls. They loved me for me-definitely not for my looks. The boys would spend hours with me, laughing and playing, but they never looked at me the way they did the pretty girls. I understood early on that I’d need to rely on my wits if I were to be appealing to the opposite sex.

Luckily, what I lacked in looks, I made up for in personality. My humor and zest for life drew people to me and eventually, in my teens, the boys came calling too. Since I’d resigned myself to being “the ugly girl” I was shocked. I found myself in no way desirable to a boy and this sudden turn of the tides confused me. This was to be the start of a long and bumpy journey.

Freckles faded, the nineties brought with it better hairstyles and the eyes that were somehow daunting as a child suddenly fit my face. I grew into myself, transforming from an ugly duckling to swan. Peoples perceptions of me changed, but my own did not. To me I was flawed, imperfect and even ghastly at times. I knew my insides were beautiful, but on the outside I felt gross. The more I worried about my appearance, the less like me I felt. I hated myself with venom-at least on the outside.

My inability to honestly access myself and find the positives was clinical; I was diagnosed with a severe case of “Dysmorphic Disorder”. I was obsessed with my flaws-both real and imagined. No one could convince me I was attractive or worthy. I got paid to model, but this only made me feel worse. With my “flower in full bloom” I focused on my thorns. No matter how good my own was I only saw that others had something better; better hair, skin, eyes, teeth, legs, lips, and so on. When the focus was on my outward appearance I was never enough.

Though I loathed my body I loved the fact that men desired it. While I had no connection to my body, I began using it to get what I want. I wanted love. I got sex. In my mind this was close enough to the real thing so I settled. My standards were so low that I settled for crumbs. If any love existed it was only for parts of me, never the whole.

My twenties were filled with the adoration of men, yet few saw through my façade, nor knew the real me. I became the sum total of my parts; I was now a pretty face and a hot bod. I got lots of attention then, but very little love. The more I searched for myself in a man the greater was my loss. My self loathing combined with pathetically low self esteem made me like a puppy; I begged for love. I was happy for any attention back then.

Today at thirty-five I am single by choice and having the greatest love affair of my life. A few years back I decided to fall in love with me. “You must love yourself first before another can love you” I now understand what it means. Today it does not matter what I look like, or what any guy thinks about it, because I know I am so much more than a body and its parts. Once again I am living from my soul. I shine from within and this makes me beautiful. I can laugh and dance and play. Freedom is beautiful.

Papierdoll staff writer Krista-Lynn Landolfi is a Professional Life Coach and Spiritual Counselor. She teaches seminars nationwide and is available for private consultation; inquire for details; Krista-Lynn@Krista-Lynn.com

And now a word from


Written By , on April 2, 2006


It has been proven that when we look good, we often feel better; it is a lot easier to believe you are fabulous, when you look fabulous. If you want to start exploring new options for your life, why not start with your wardrobe? Experimenting with color and style is a safe way to try on a new you and gain new perspective for your life. Adding colorful accessories like a purse, necklace or pair of shoes, can change your look AND your outlook on life. With every visible change you make to your wardrobe, see yourself able to make changes in your life just as easily. Imagine that you can adorn yourself with qualities like, optimism, confidence and enthusiasm, while discarding all doubts and fears, like an old coat that no longer fits. Unlike our clothing, our lives must be custom designed, if they are to fit well. Once you have refocused your mind on the positive you will feel empowered to make other improvements and changes in your life.

Adding color to your wardrobe can be an instant mood lifter-shifting both your perspective and how others view you. Red renews passion and says “I am sexy and alive” Yellow boosts confidence and says, “I am powerful and compassionate.” Orange, will restore your vitality while expressing, “I am creative and courageous.” Prisons and hospitals are painted light blue because the color has a calming affect and induces a state of peace. Every color in the spectrum emits an energy that affects us; the real reason women are so drawn to shades of pink, is that this color reflects our natural state of unconditional love. The next time a dark mood threatens to take over your day, lighten up with some color.

Papierdoll staff writer Krista-Lynn Landolfi is a Professional Life Coach and Spiritual Counselor. She teaches seminars nationwide and is available for private consultation; inquire for details; Krista-Lynn@Krista-Lynn.com

And now a word from


Written By , on March 1, 2006

Is Hollywood really declining in glamour or are those that we put on a pedestal really not that glamorous to begin with? The stylishly challenged (names have been withheld to protect the innocent) are viewed as role models, muses, even inspiration. Today’s generation is so impressionable, but can we blame them? Some may say yes, because of the access they have to the top designers and stylists. Some may say no, because a lot of Hollywood’s starlets come from meager beginnings and are still learning the ropes and they have room for improvement. Take a tip from Halle Berry. She in no way, shape or form started out being a darling amongst stylists and the media when it came to red carpet style. Through the years though, Berry evolved into a true arbiter of style.

Hollywood glamour truly takes a back seat when even a multi-millionaire fashion designer to the stars, Valentino, turns down the chance to design one of America’s top socialites and personalities’ (in terms of publicity) wedding dress – Paris Hilton’s. Valentino was recently quoted in New York Post’s Page Sixas saying, “No, I don’t like her. She is marrying the son of a friend of mine. They have billions. She is vulgar, and she is not even pretty.” After pausing for a moment to gather his breath, Valentino concluded, “The Hiltons, they have nothing.” SCANDALOUS!!!

Good for you, Valentino! I applaud him for being a person with such a considerable amount of influence in the fashion industry, and not being lured into the jaws of the “Paris Hilton” public relations machine.

Enough words on Miss Hilton; she already has enough people writing about her every move thanks to “Page Six” and other celebrity tabloids. I just wonder why Hollywood seems to only do the “glamorous” thing when on the red carpet. And even then, they barely do it. I’m not saying that our starlets should resort to dressing how Jackie O., Audrey Hepburn, Lena Horne, etc., did in their day; when you are constantly in the spotlight though, are Ugg boots a really good choice to wear with everything? Nicole Richie seems to be taking the cue in dressing with more class, but she’s one of several stars who seem to be nearly killing themselves with crazy diets to do it. On the other hand, Mary Kate Olsen’s idea of red carpet wear looks like anything from your local Salvation Army’s bargain bin. I’m sure they can muster up some outfit that doesn’t (1) make them look like poster children for I-am-so-skinny.com, or (2) make them look as if they stink.

What Hollywood society fails to realize is that with the decline in “Hollywood Glamour” comes the decline in being stylish role models. The Hollywood starlet of yesteryear wouldn’t be caught in public without that glamour look. Granted, what you wear and how you wear should not play a part in how well of a role model you come across as being, but impressions are key in Hollywood. Maybe a lot these un-glam clones are trying to make a statement with how they dress. I’m dumbfounded as to what that statement may be.

However, should the blame be based on only those who have “face time” in Hollywood? I say no. Why not slap the hands of Uggs, Kitson, Fred Segal, Heatherette and other kitchy boutiques of the LA and NYC scene? There are only so many mini, distressed jean skirts, gigantic, slouchy hobo bags or skinny jeans that one can wear. But, then again, maybe Hollywood is trying to create a new type of glamour … ”Clone Chic.”

Lindsey Lohan photo courtesy of www.purseblog.com/
Paris Hilton photo courtesy of www.chadmuska.org
Ashlee Simpson photo courtesy of www.purseblog.com/

And now a word from


Written By , on February 1, 2006

There was a time when looking my best was very important to me. As an actress in Hollywood, it was a part of the job. I was expected to look good, so I did. As a teenager, I went through entire semesters of school never wearing the same outfit twice. I did not follow the trends, I set them. Before life got serious and I grew up, I had fun with clothing and fashion. I became a master at the use of accessories, and color became yet another extension of my self-expression. Every outfit I wore was like a costume, fit for the role I was to play that day. My choice of clothing now, says little more than that I have become lazy. Much of my time now is spent behind closed doors, writing. No one cares, nor sees, what I look like, so I do not care. When the pressure to look good was gone, my desire to look good left with it.

Today my wardrobe consisted of mismatched socks, a hat to hide the faded highlights and a sweater three sizes too big, but thick enough to keep me warm. The only time I dress up now is for a photo op. If there will be no proof, I will be in sweats. As you can see, these are desperate times, so desperate measures are called for. I will be covering fashion week this year, so once again it is a part of the job for me to look my best and I feel liberated. Whatever your inspiration, it is never too late to reignite your passion for fashion. If you too have let yourself go, I implore you to reclaim the glamour and revamp your look, before all you can do is look back and remember the good old days. Ask yourself what you would wear if you thought that it mattered. And trust me, it matters.

If you once salivated for a great pair of heels,and arrived early to be first in line at a sample sale but now look shockingly like your mother, or worse, grandmother, this intervention is for you. It is time to surrender the sweats, and remember just how fun dressing up can be! Dive into your closets, spend an evening perusing the fashion magazines and let yourself imagine the woman you would like to become. Somewhere in our minds we all have a vision of our best self, the life we would live if we thought anything was possible, and of the clothing we would wear, if we thought we could pull it off.

No matter your size, style or budget, you can make the choice to express your inner beauty, outwardly. Let the world get a glimpse of who you are, through the clothing that you wear. We all “wear many hats” in the course of a day – daughter, wife, mother, worker, student – the list goes on. It’s important you put yourself at the top. Give yourself a reason to dress up. Make reservations at the best restaurant in town, get tickets to a play or be adventurous and throw a party. Show off your hard won curves with a sexy new style and indulge your senses with silk and cashmere; our lives were meant to be celebrated and a great place to start is with fashion. Trust that you are beautiful and dress yourself from the inside out.

A wonderful example of this is a teacher I have studied with. Years ago, when she was just starting out and still trying to make her mark with in her field, she appeared very stiff in a button up suit and fancy dress shirt, with a serious and astute demeanor. If you were to meet this spiritual pioneer today, you would find yourself in the presence of a mystical goddess, complete with bright, flowing fabrics and sparkly jewels. She is a woman at once comfortable with herself and with expressing it. Gone is the tight smile and the ill fitting suits, gone is the suppressed woman who is trying to look the way she thinks she should look, in order to live up to her job. Today my mentor shines from within and it is reflected in every item of clothing she chooses. This dynamic teacher has written numerous best-sellers and now travels the world, in style.

I admire her, not so much for her fashions, but for her ability to live truly to herself. She wears what she enjoys and she enjoys what she wears. Her style speaks volumes about who she is. You can immediately sense that this is a wise and powerful woman, her clothing simply accentuates this truth. Our confidence, or lack thereof, shines through. So it is important to feel good in what you are wearing. While our beauty really does come from with in, it can be enhanced or decreased, based on how we choose to dress. The way we look determines instantly what people will think of us. All day long, with everyone that we meet, we size them up and write their life story, all based on their appearance. People say “don’t judge a book by its cover,” but the truth is, great covers sell more books.

People will make an assumption about you, based upon the clothes you are wearing. I want to be seen for who I am. This funny looking bag lady thing I have got going on, this is not me. I am hot. I have style, passion and even a bit of pizzazz. I once had a line in a commercial, where I had to describe the perfect man. I declare he has a certain je nai se quai, that little something special you can’t quite put your finger on. You can only have it if you are totally being you. The something special is a fullness of being. One who is so content with themselves that they have chosen to have fun, not just with their wardrobe, but with everything that they do. That’s the person I aspire to be.

And now a word from


Written By , on January 2, 2006

Trends come and go. Regardless of how fabulous the trend is at the time, an expiration date is always summoned at the height of its popularity. In 2005, we witnessed the continuance of Uggs and boho chic. We also witnessed one of the fashion industries brightest protégés become a fashion designer herself; can we say Gwen Stefani?

What does all this mean, you ask? Well, it means that with this brand new year we fashion folk are bound to make some hits and misses with our own wardrobes. Plaid has been said to be making a comeback and I hear that Parisian chic is also slowly creeping back in. So before we sit back and let the good times roll (and break the bank) let’s review what we already have. We’ve all heard of the fashion must-have list regarding which items will never go out of style. You know, the little black dress, a great pair of jeans, red lipstick, etc…

But, if you ask me, black dresses are great, but it gets a little old (and noticeably lazy) after a while. And, needless to say, as much as I’d love to wear red lipstick, it just doesn’t correspond with my complexion (the fact is I’m more Beyonce than Nicole Kidman.) Oh and that whole “great pair of jeans thing” is a great idea, but there are too many great brands and styles to choose from and one pair just doesn’t cut if for me anymore.

After looking through my personal wardrobe and reviewing the goods, the bads and the uglies, I realized that over the years I too have acquired some true-blue items and ideas that stick around year after year. And none of them involve red lipstick.

Behold my personal list of timeless chic (in no particular order.)
1.(authentic)Vintage shopping – Okay, so heading to H&M for the cool retro Chanel Suit knock-off is great, but the real thing or, for God’s sake, a vintage knockoff, serves a better purpose.
2. A long silk scarf with a bold print – Whether around your neck, head, waist or arm, the possibilities are endless,
3. Black flats – It’s not always about the pumps.
4. Wide leg pants – Note: pants do not equal jeans. Wide leg jeans are, for me, an acquired taste.
5. Silver and/or Gold hoop earrings – The size of the hoop depends on the season, but let us not mix the silk scarf and earrings; pirate chic can only work for Galliano girls…
6. Costume jewelry – It causes conversation, it makes dressing up and dressing down much more interesting.
7. Plain ol’ wife beater t-shirts are comfy and the neckline is actually versatile on a variety of body types, although I’ve never been fond of the name.
8. A fitted black blazer – Mix it, match it, wear with it what you will.
9. A fragrance – It should be one of the first things you put on and the last thing you’re remembered by.
10. Confidence – This item works even when you’re naked.

Remember, what you wear speaks volumes about who you are. Trends are tempermental, true style is natural.

What items will you still wear in 2006?


Anna Wintour has definitely created a signature style of her own over the years.


Do you think Ms. Hepburn would’ve traded her flats for Uggs this past year?

And now a word from


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